Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*

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Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*. / Davies, Sarah Rachael.

I: Science, Technology & Human Values, Bind 43, Nr. 2, 03.2018, s. 171-197 .

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Davies, SR 2018, 'Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*', Science, Technology & Human Values, bind 43, nr. 2, s. 171-197 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0162243917703464

APA

Davies, S. R. (2018). Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*. Science, Technology & Human Values, 43(2), 171-197 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0162243917703464

Vancouver

Davies SR. Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*. Science, Technology & Human Values. 2018 mar;43(2):171-197 . https://doi.org/10.1177/0162243917703464

Author

Davies, Sarah Rachael. / Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*. I: Science, Technology & Human Values. 2018 ; Bind 43, Nr. 2. s. 171-197 .

Bibtex

@article{500de0314a0a42b2a950bb901ef8a5c4,
title = "Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*",
abstract = "The rise of a “maker movement,” located in hacker and makerspaces and involving the democratization of technologies of production and support of grassroots innovation, is receiving increasing attention from science and technology studies (STS) scholarship. This article explores how hacking is characterized by users of hacker and makerspaces and relates this to broader discussion of the maker movement as, for instance, promoting innovation, engaged in countercultural critique, or as accessible to anyone. Based on an interview study of users of twelve hacker and makerspaces across the United States, it argues that for these users, hacking is not about politics, commercial innovation, or critique. Rather, it is understood as a lifestyle one subscribes to, a meaningful leisure activity, or as providing access to a welcoming and close-knit community. Contrary to expectations of the maker movement as heralding social change, the benefits of hacking were viewed as personal rather than political, economic, or social; similarly, democratization of technology was experienced as rather incidental to most hackers’ and makers’ experiences.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, hacking, maker movement, hackerspaces, innovation, leisure, community",
author = "Davies, {Sarah Rachael}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1177/0162243917703464",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "171--197",
journal = "Science, Technology & Human Values",
issn = "0162-2439",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing Hacking: Mundane Engagement in US Hacker and Makerspaces*

AU - Davies, Sarah Rachael

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - The rise of a “maker movement,” located in hacker and makerspaces and involving the democratization of technologies of production and support of grassroots innovation, is receiving increasing attention from science and technology studies (STS) scholarship. This article explores how hacking is characterized by users of hacker and makerspaces and relates this to broader discussion of the maker movement as, for instance, promoting innovation, engaged in countercultural critique, or as accessible to anyone. Based on an interview study of users of twelve hacker and makerspaces across the United States, it argues that for these users, hacking is not about politics, commercial innovation, or critique. Rather, it is understood as a lifestyle one subscribes to, a meaningful leisure activity, or as providing access to a welcoming and close-knit community. Contrary to expectations of the maker movement as heralding social change, the benefits of hacking were viewed as personal rather than political, economic, or social; similarly, democratization of technology was experienced as rather incidental to most hackers’ and makers’ experiences.

AB - The rise of a “maker movement,” located in hacker and makerspaces and involving the democratization of technologies of production and support of grassroots innovation, is receiving increasing attention from science and technology studies (STS) scholarship. This article explores how hacking is characterized by users of hacker and makerspaces and relates this to broader discussion of the maker movement as, for instance, promoting innovation, engaged in countercultural critique, or as accessible to anyone. Based on an interview study of users of twelve hacker and makerspaces across the United States, it argues that for these users, hacking is not about politics, commercial innovation, or critique. Rather, it is understood as a lifestyle one subscribes to, a meaningful leisure activity, or as providing access to a welcoming and close-knit community. Contrary to expectations of the maker movement as heralding social change, the benefits of hacking were viewed as personal rather than political, economic, or social; similarly, democratization of technology was experienced as rather incidental to most hackers’ and makers’ experiences.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - hacking

KW - maker movement

KW - hackerspaces

KW - innovation

KW - leisure

KW - community

U2 - 10.1177/0162243917703464

DO - 10.1177/0162243917703464

M3 - Journal article

VL - 43

SP - 171

EP - 197

JO - Science, Technology & Human Values

JF - Science, Technology & Human Values

SN - 0162-2439

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 188448585