Drops of virtue: The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Drops of virtue : The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet. / Caple, Jane Eluned.

I: Religion and Society, Bind 8, 2017, s. 145-157.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Caple, JE 2017, 'Drops of virtue: The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet', Religion and Society, bind 8, s. 145-157. https://doi.org/10.3167/arrs.2017.080109

APA

Caple, J. E. (2017). Drops of virtue: The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet. Religion and Society, 8, 145-157. https://doi.org/10.3167/arrs.2017.080109

Vancouver

Caple JE. Drops of virtue: The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet. Religion and Society. 2017;8:145-157. https://doi.org/10.3167/arrs.2017.080109

Author

Caple, Jane Eluned. / Drops of virtue : The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet. I: Religion and Society. 2017 ; Bind 8. s. 145-157.

Bibtex

@article{ae15396cb12444e0857f9409216cf72c,
title = "Drops of virtue: The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet",
abstract = "A significant strand of anthropological work on Buddhist generosity practices in Theravādin and Tibetan Buddhist societies has examined their role in reproducing and reinforcing social and economic hierarchies. Inspired by the recent ‘moral turn’ in anthropology, this article addresses the moral dimensions of these practices by analyzing debates, decisions, and judgments about what to sponsor and how to do so during times of accelerated ‘modernizing’ change. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in northeastern Tibet (Amdo) conducted between 2008 and 2015, I focus on a mode of collective sponsorship that has, in different contexts, been considered good, problematic, or even wrong. The moral grounds for such evaluations show that sponsorship is evaluated and experienced not only as a Buddhist practice but also as a social and economic practice with direct consequences for both individuals and communities. The moral stakes of generosity practices are shown to extend beyond individual ethics to the common good.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, Buddhism, gift exchange, Tibet, morality, China, patronage",
author = "Caple, {Jane Eluned}",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.3167/arrs.2017.080109",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "145--157",
journal = "Religion and Society",
issn = "1437-5370",
publisher = "Walterde Gruyter GmbH",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drops of virtue

T2 - The ethics of collective sponsorship in Tibet

AU - Caple, Jane Eluned

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - A significant strand of anthropological work on Buddhist generosity practices in Theravādin and Tibetan Buddhist societies has examined their role in reproducing and reinforcing social and economic hierarchies. Inspired by the recent ‘moral turn’ in anthropology, this article addresses the moral dimensions of these practices by analyzing debates, decisions, and judgments about what to sponsor and how to do so during times of accelerated ‘modernizing’ change. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in northeastern Tibet (Amdo) conducted between 2008 and 2015, I focus on a mode of collective sponsorship that has, in different contexts, been considered good, problematic, or even wrong. The moral grounds for such evaluations show that sponsorship is evaluated and experienced not only as a Buddhist practice but also as a social and economic practice with direct consequences for both individuals and communities. The moral stakes of generosity practices are shown to extend beyond individual ethics to the common good.

AB - A significant strand of anthropological work on Buddhist generosity practices in Theravādin and Tibetan Buddhist societies has examined their role in reproducing and reinforcing social and economic hierarchies. Inspired by the recent ‘moral turn’ in anthropology, this article addresses the moral dimensions of these practices by analyzing debates, decisions, and judgments about what to sponsor and how to do so during times of accelerated ‘modernizing’ change. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in northeastern Tibet (Amdo) conducted between 2008 and 2015, I focus on a mode of collective sponsorship that has, in different contexts, been considered good, problematic, or even wrong. The moral grounds for such evaluations show that sponsorship is evaluated and experienced not only as a Buddhist practice but also as a social and economic practice with direct consequences for both individuals and communities. The moral stakes of generosity practices are shown to extend beyond individual ethics to the common good.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - Buddhism

KW - gift exchange

KW - Tibet

KW - morality

KW - China

KW - patronage

U2 - 10.3167/arrs.2017.080109

DO - 10.3167/arrs.2017.080109

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 145

EP - 157

JO - Religion and Society

JF - Religion and Society

SN - 1437-5370

ER -

ID: 214465708