Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang

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Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang. / Beller-Hann, Ildiko.

I: Central Asian Survey, Bind 31, Nr. 3, 03.12.2012, s. 311-325.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Beller-Hann, I 2012, 'Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang', Central Asian Survey, bind 31, nr. 3, s. 311-325. https://doi.org/10.1080/02634937.2012.723417

APA

Beller-Hann, I. (2012). Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang. Central Asian Survey, 31(3), 311-325. https://doi.org/10.1080/02634937.2012.723417

Vancouver

Beller-Hann I. Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang. Central Asian Survey. 2012 dec 3;31(3):311-325. https://doi.org/10.1080/02634937.2012.723417

Author

Beller-Hann, Ildiko. / Feudal villains or just rulers? The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang. I: Central Asian Survey. 2012 ; Bind 31, Nr. 3. s. 311-325.

Bibtex

@article{044844c091d34a419ca12b1d987a2f8b,
title = "Feudal villains or just rulers?: The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang",
abstract = "Focusing on representations of the Muslim dynasty that exercised power locally under the Qing dynasty until 1930 in the oasis of Qumul in eastern Xinjiang, this article challenges the binary notions of ‘official’ versus ‘unofficial’ discourse by looking at the production of historical knowledge on the ground. Versions of local histories are communicated both in censored publications and in informally transmitted oral narratives, which are not independent realms but in constant dialogue with each other. Produced at the interface of the oral and the written, these representations are laden with contradictions and ambiguities, portraying the Muslim dynasty sometimes as feudal exploiters, at other times as models of good governance. It will be shown how historical knowledge is produced at the junctures of the oral and the written, and of official and unofficial discourses.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, Uyghur, eastern Xinjiang, historical representations",
author = "Ildiko Beller-Hann",
note = "0263-4937 (Print), 1465-3354 (Online)",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/02634937.2012.723417",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "311--325",
journal = "Central Asian Survey",
issn = "0263-4937",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feudal villains or just rulers?

T2 - The contestation of historical narratives in eastern Xinjiang

AU - Beller-Hann, Ildiko

N1 - 0263-4937 (Print), 1465-3354 (Online)

PY - 2012/12/3

Y1 - 2012/12/3

N2 - Focusing on representations of the Muslim dynasty that exercised power locally under the Qing dynasty until 1930 in the oasis of Qumul in eastern Xinjiang, this article challenges the binary notions of ‘official’ versus ‘unofficial’ discourse by looking at the production of historical knowledge on the ground. Versions of local histories are communicated both in censored publications and in informally transmitted oral narratives, which are not independent realms but in constant dialogue with each other. Produced at the interface of the oral and the written, these representations are laden with contradictions and ambiguities, portraying the Muslim dynasty sometimes as feudal exploiters, at other times as models of good governance. It will be shown how historical knowledge is produced at the junctures of the oral and the written, and of official and unofficial discourses.

AB - Focusing on representations of the Muslim dynasty that exercised power locally under the Qing dynasty until 1930 in the oasis of Qumul in eastern Xinjiang, this article challenges the binary notions of ‘official’ versus ‘unofficial’ discourse by looking at the production of historical knowledge on the ground. Versions of local histories are communicated both in censored publications and in informally transmitted oral narratives, which are not independent realms but in constant dialogue with each other. Produced at the interface of the oral and the written, these representations are laden with contradictions and ambiguities, portraying the Muslim dynasty sometimes as feudal exploiters, at other times as models of good governance. It will be shown how historical knowledge is produced at the junctures of the oral and the written, and of official and unofficial discourses.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - Uyghur

KW - eastern Xinjiang

KW - historical representations

U2 - 10.1080/02634937.2012.723417

DO - 10.1080/02634937.2012.723417

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 311

EP - 325

JO - Central Asian Survey

JF - Central Asian Survey

SN - 0263-4937

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 40798973